What the National Park Service Alliance Means for Scouting

What the National Park Service Alliance Means for Scouting

The alliance between Scouting and the National Park Service is a natural kinship. After all, “some of the best Scouting happens in National Park Service sites,” according to Scouting expert Bryan Wendell.

The memorandum of understanding (MOU) that seals the bond between the two groups was recently renewed in an effort to continue educating young people about camping, the outdoors and the environment—so let the Scouting adventures live on!

The MOU renewal, which lasts for five years, was made official with the signatures of Jonathan B. Jarvis, director of the National Park Service, and Michael Surbaugh, Chief Scout Executive of the BSA.

In a recent blog post, Bryan on Scouting details the parallels of the two groups, why the BSA-NPS alliance  is meaningful to Scouting, and what the MOU renewal means for NPS, BSA, and of course, YOU!

Bryan’s blog break-down explains what each group promises to do, for example:

The National Park Service will:

  1. Assist local Boy Scout councils, units, and groups associated with conservation to develop projects related to national parks
  2. Advise the BSA on land conservation exhibits for national and local environmental conferences, fairs, and events
  3. Provide opportunities for local Scouting units to participate in the NPS improvement projects and interpretive programs
  4. Participate in relevant Boy Scout national and regional conventions and meetings
  5. Encourage national parks to provide local Boy Scout councils with opportunities for earning conservation-oriented awards
  6. Provide recognition to Scouting units and individual Scouts participating in the NPS Scout Ranger Resource Stewardship Program

The BSA will:

  1. Make its personnel available to consult on Boy Scout program requirements and for joint development of informational materials associated with the national joint program initiative and other environmental and outdoor education activities promoting NPS leadership, mentoring, and internship opportunities
  2. Promote Scout unit awareness of the Scout Ranger Resource Stewardship Program
  3. Share in the publicity and marketing of the partnership and Scout Ranger Resource Stewardship Program
  4. Encourage participation in NPS age-appropriate service projects for Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Ventures and Scout leaders

Get the full details on this famous Scouting friendship by reading the original story from Bryan on Scouting, then head to NPS.gov to find your nearest national park!

Have you visited any national parks? Share your adventures with us in the comments below!

Rochelle Randles

Rochelle Randles is a communications specialist at the Boy Scouts of America. She enjoys sharing incredible adventure stories within the Scouting community and beyond. If you have story ideas or questions, reach out to us at communications@scouting.org.

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What the National Park Service Alliance Means for Scouting
What the National Park Service Alliance Means for Scouting
What the National Park Service Alliance Means for Scouting
What the National Park Service Alliance Means for Scouting